CAN Social at SfN in Washington

Join us at the CAN Social at SfN 2014 in Washington!

November 18th, 6-9PM, at the Brixton Pub

More Details (PDF) - Directions (Google map)

Please also drop by to see us in person at our exhibit booth at SfN!

Summer 2014 Newsletter!

Our most recent newsletter includes highlights from our Montreal meeting and more! Read it now:
CAN Connection - Summer 2014

CAN connection

Tang prize in Psychology

The TANG Prize for Achievements in Psychology honours a living internationally-recognized scholar in Psychology or a closely-related field who has made an exceptional contribution to the field anywhere in the world. It includes a $100 000 CAD prize.
The Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto is accepting applications for this prize until August 15, 2014.
More details at http://www.psych.utoronto.ca/tangprize/

CAN connection

Canadian Neuroscience Meeting 2014

Thank you for making our meeting in Montreal such a great success!

View the meeting website
Or visit our Flickr gallery to view pictures of the meeting!

2014 CAN Young Investigator Awards

Dr. Stephanie Borgland, from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and
Dr. Brian Chen, from McGill University, are both winners of CAN Young Investigator Awards for 2014. Both were judged equally deserving of this distinction, which recognizes research excellence of a young neuroscientist.
Read their profiles here:
Brian Chen - Stephanie Borgland

Stephanie Borgland

2014 CAN Young Investigator Awards

Dr. Stephanie Borgland, from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and
Dr. Brian Chen, from McGill University, are both winners of CAN Young Investigator Awards for 2014. Both were judged equally deserving of this distinction, which recognizes research excellence in a young neuroscientist.
Read their profiles here:
Brian Chen - Stephanie Borgland

Brian Chen

New insight into fatal childhood brain tumour may lead to patient-targeted treatment

Dr. Cynthia Hawkins

Cynthia Hawkins

Imagine being a parent receiving news that your six-year-old child has a brain tumour that has no effective treatment, and is almost universally fatal. This is a harsh reality for the 30 children in Canada who are diagnosed each year with a rare paediatric cancer called diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG). +++ »

Noisy brain signals: How the schizophrenic brain misinterprets the world

Christopher Pack

Christopher Pack

People with schizophrenia often misinterpret what they see and experience in the world. New research provides insight into the brain mechanisms that might be responsible for this misinterpretation. The study from the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital – The Neuro – at McGill University and McGill University Health Centre, reveals that certain errors in visual perception in people with schizophrenia are consistent with interference or ‘noise’ in a brain signal known as a corollary discharge. +++ »

Parkinson’s disease: Quickly identifying patients at risk of dementia

Dr. Oury Monchi

Dr. Oury Monchi

It may now be possible to identify the first-stage Parkinson’s patients who will go on to develop dementia, according to a study conducted at the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal by Dr. Oury Monchi, PhD, and his postdoctoral student, Dr. Alexandru Hanganu, MD, PhD, both of whom are affiliated with Université de Montréal. These findings were published in the journal Brain. +++ »

Scientists catch brain damage in the act

Brian MacVicar

Brian MacVicar

Scientists have uncovered how inflammation and lack of oxygen conspire to cause brain damage in conditions such as stroke and Alzheimer’s disease.

The discovery, published today in Neuron, brings researchers a step closer to finding potential targets to treat neurodegenerative disorders. +++ »

Learning new ideas alters brain cells

Shernaz Bamji

Shernaz Bamji

A new University of British Columbia study identifies an important molecular change that occurs in the brain when we learn and remember.

Published this month in Nature Neuroscience, the research shows that learning stimulates our brain cells in a manner that causes a small fatty acid to attach to delta-catenin, a protein in the brain. This biochemical modification is essential in producing the changes in brain cell connectivity associated with learning, the study finds. +++ »

Researchers discover how to target and disable ‘bad apple’ proteins

Yu Tian Wang

Yu Tian Wang

A new technique that targets proteins that cause disease and destroys “bad apples” in the cell has been developed by researchers at the University of British Columbia’s Brain Research Centre, part of Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute.

The findings, published this month in Nature Neuroscience, has important implications for a variety of diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, stroke and even cancers, the researchers say. +++ »