CAN Trainee research feature: Claire Gizowski, McGill University

Watch this week’s CAN Trainee Research feature, with Claire Gizowski, who recently obtained her PhD at McGill University, working with Dr. Charles Bourque. She presents the publication:

Gizowski C, Bourque CW. Sodium regulates clock time and output via an excitatory GABAergic pathway. Nature. 2020 Jul;583(7816):421-424. doi: 10.1038/s41586-020-2471-x.

Dr. Gizowski is currently a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California in San Francisco https://profiles.ucsf.edu/claire.gizowski

More videos are also available here, with submission instructions

https://can-acn.org/can-trainee-research-features/

CAN Trainee research feature: Nuria Daviu, Hotchkiss Brain Institute

CAN Trainee research features are a new opportunity for Canadian neuroscience trainees to showcase their research through short video features. We aim to make this a weekly feature and to share on our website and social media accounts, so please consider submitting a proposal to us!

This week’s feature is Nuria Daviu, a researcher in the laboratory of Dr. Jaideep Bains, at the Hotchkiss Brain Institute.

Read the paper here: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41593-020-0591-0

Videos are also available here, with submission instructions

https://can-acn.org/can-trainee-research-features/

Check it out!

CAN Trainee Research Feature: Tasnia Rahman, McGill University

We are excited to launch a new opportunity for Canadian neuroscience trainees to showcase their research through short video features.  We aim to make this a weekly feature and to share on our website and social media accounts, so please consider submitting a proposal to us.  We would love to feature your research!

This week’s feature is: Tasnia Rahman, McGill University – Stentian structural plasticity in the developing visual system


Tasnia Rahman is a researcher in the laboratory of Dr. Edward Ruthazer at McGill University.

Read the paper here: https://www.pnas.org/content/117/20/10636

Videos will be also available here, with submission instructions

https://can-acn.org/can-trainee-research-features/

Congratulations to the Royal Society of Canada Class of 2020

Royal Society of Canada class of 2020

Congratulations to the Canadian neuroscientists newly elected fellows of the Royal Society of Canada, and to the incoming class of the college of new scientists.

“The Royal Society of Canada is delighted to recognise this year’s exceptional cohort of inductees, as the contributions of these outstanding artists, scholars and scientists have significantly impacted their respective disciplines at both national and international levels.” says RSC President Jeremy McNeil.
Congratulations to the following Canadian neuroscientists elected to this prestigious Society!

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Vascular development may be at risk in autism

Early deficits in the formation of brain blood vessels translate into later autistic traits in miceBaptiste LAcoste OHRI

A Canadian collaboration led by Dr. Baptiste Lacoste has undertaken the first ever in-depth study of vasculature in the autistic brain. The product of four years of work, a paper published in the September issue of Nature Neuroscience lays out several lines of novel evidence that strongly implicate defects in endothelial cells—the lining of blood vessels—in autism.

Dr. Lacoste, a scientist at The Ottawa Hospital and an assistant professor in the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Medicine and Brain and Mind Research institute, heads a lab that specializes in neurovascular interactions in health and disease. In collaboration with researchers at McGill University, Laval University, and the National Research Council of Canada, Dr. Lacoste’s team used a mouse model with one of the most common genetic mutations found in autism spectrum disorder—16p11.2 deletion, or “16p” for short. (more…)