CAN Newsletter January 2015 Canadian Neuroscience 2015 meeting in Vancouver, BC Canada impact of neurological disorders in Canada CAN Social Nov 18 at Brixton Pub Brenda Milner wins Kavli prize in neuroscience

 

Smoking thins vital part of brain

Dr. Sherif Karama

Dr. Sherif Karama

Years ago, children were warned that smoking could stunt their growth, but now a major study by an international team including the Montreal Neurological Institute at McGill University and the University of Edinburgh shows new evidence that long-term smoking could cause thinning of the brain’s cortex.

Revolutionary new probe zooms in on cancer cells

Kevin Petrecca

Kevin Petrecca

Brain cancer patients may live longer thanks to a new cancer-detection method developed by researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital – The Neuro, at McGill University and the MUHC, and Polytechnique Montréal. The collaborative team has created a powerful new intraoperative probe for detecting cancer cells.

HBI researchers find new therapy dramatically benefits stroke patients

Michael Hill

Dr. Michael Hill

Canadian researchers have completed an international randomized controlled trial showing that a clot retrieval procedure, known as endovascular treatment (ET), can dramatically improve patient outcomes after an acute ischemic stroke. The study, led by researchers at the University of Calgary’s Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI), shows a dramatic improvement in outcomes and a reduction in deaths from stroke. The results of this study were published in the Feb. 11 online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).

Psychopathic violent offenders’ brains can’t understand punishment

Sheilagh Hodgins

Sheilagh Hodgins

Psychopathic violent offenders have abnormalities in the parts of the brain related to learning from punishment, according to an MRI study led by Sheilagh Hodgins and Nigel Blackwood. “One in five violent offenders is a psychopath. They have higher rates of recidivism and don’t benefit from rehabilitation programmes. Our research reveals why this is and can hopefully improve childhood interventions to prevent violence and behavioural therapies to reduce recidivism,” explained Professor Hodgins of the University of Montreal and Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal.