Fall 2014 Newsletter!

Read the latest in CAN connection! Features a new "Neuroscientists in the news" section, prizes and awards, hot neuroscience topic and more. Read it now:
CAN Connection - Fall 2014

CAN connection

CAN Social at SfN in Washington

Join us at the CAN Social at SfN 2014 in Washington!

November 18th, 6-9PM, at the Brixton Pub

More Details (PDF) - Directions (Google map)

Please also drop by to see us in person at our exhibit booth at SfN!

Brenda Milner

Canadian Neuroscience Meeting 2014

Thank you for making our meeting in Montreal such a great success!

View the meeting website
Or visit our Flickr gallery to view pictures of the meeting!

2014 CAN Young Investigator Awards

Dr. Stephanie Borgland, from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and
Dr. Brian Chen, from McGill University, are both winners of CAN Young Investigator Awards for 2014. Both were judged equally deserving of this distinction, which recognizes research excellence of a young neuroscientist.
Read their profiles here:
Brian Chen - Stephanie Borgland

Stephanie Borgland

2014 CAN Young Investigator Awards

Dr. Stephanie Borgland, from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and
Dr. Brian Chen, from McGill University, are both winners of CAN Young Investigator Awards for 2014. Both were judged equally deserving of this distinction, which recognizes research excellence in a young neuroscientist.
Read their profiles here:
Brian Chen - Stephanie Borgland

Brian Chen

Canadian Neuroscience News

View more stories featured this year. You can also submit a press release to CAN for consideration.

A new therapeutic target may prevent blindness in premature babies at risk of retinopathy

Sylvain Chemtob

Sylvain Chemtob

According to a study conducted by pediatricians and researchers at Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Center (Sainte-Justine) and Université de Montréal published online in the prestigious medical journal Nature Medicine on September 14, 2014, the activation of a receptor that migrates to the nucleus of nerve cells in the retina promotes the growth of blood vessels. The finding opens the possibility of developing new, more selective drugs to control the abnormal growth of blood vessels and prevent blindness including retinopathy of prematurity, a disorder that may result in retinal detachment due to abnormal blood vessel growth in the retina of the eye. +++ »

Western neuroscientists decode vegetative state experiences with Hitchcock film

Adrian Owen

Adrian Owen

Researchers at Western University have extended their game-changing brain scanning techniques by showing that a short Alfred Hitchcock movie can be used to detect consciousness in vegetative state patients. The study included a Canadian participant who had been entirely unresponsive for 16 years, but is now known to be aware and able to follow the plot of movies. +++ »

New Western neuroscientist explores “touchy” subject

Andrew Pruszynski

Andrew Pruszynski

When you reach into your pocket, you can easily tell a button from a coin. Solving this seemingly simple problem is actually amazingly complicated. The long-held scientific explanation is that neurons in the cerebral cortex, which is the part of the brain reserved for the most complicated functions, make the differentiation but recent findings from a new recruit to Western University show that it may actually be touch neurons in the skin correctly identifying your pocket change. +++ »

Chemical signals in the brain help guide risky decisions

Stan Floresco

Stan Floresco

Dopamine plays a key role in decisions involving risk and reward, says UBC’s Stan Floresco.

A gambler’s decision to stay or fold in a game of cards could be influenced by a chemical in the brain, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia.

The rise and fall of dopamine plays a key role in decisions involving risk and reward, from a baseball player trying to steal a base to an investor buying or selling a stock. +++ »

Researchers unlock new mechanism in pain management

Gerald Zamponi

Gerald Zamponi

It’s in the brain where we perceive the unpleasant sensations of pain, and researchers have long been examining how calcium channels in the brain and peripheral nervous system contribute to the development of chronic pain conditions.

Neuroscientist Gerald Zamponi, PhD, and his team at the University of Calgary’s Hotchkiss Brain Institute have discovered a new mechanism that can reverse chronic pain. +++ »

Inflammation after nervous system injury worsens damage and functional loss

Samuel David

Samuel David

In a new study published 2 September 2014 in the scientific journal Neuron, Sam David and his team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Heath Centre shed light on why inflammation after nervous system injury, such as spinal cord trauma, worsens damage and functional loss. Sam David says that “a cytokine called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and iron from red blood cells that are phagocytosed by macrophages favours a prolonged shift to harmful pro-inflammatory type of macrophage that is detrimental to recovery.” +++ »