Summer 2014 Newsletter!

Our most recent newsletter includes highlights from our Montreal meeting and more! Read it now:
CAN Connection - Summer 2014

CAN connection

Tang prize in Psychology

The TANG Prize for Achievements in Psychology honours a living internationally-recognized scholar in Psychology or a closely-related field who has made an exceptional contribution to the field anywhere in the world. It includes a $100 000 CAD prize.
The Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto is accepting applications for this prize until August 15, 2014.
More details at http://www.psych.utoronto.ca/tangprize/

CAN connection

Canadian Neuroscience Meeting 2014

Thank you for making our meeting in Montreal such a great success!

View the meeting website
Or visit our Flickr gallery to view pictures of the meeting!

2014 CAN Young Investigator Awards

Dr. Stephanie Borgland, from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and
Dr. Brian Chen, from McGill University, are both winners of CAN Young Investigator Awards for 2014. Both were judged equally deserving of this distinction, which recognizes research excellence of a young neuroscientist.
Read their profiles here:
Brian Chen - Stephanie Borgland

Stephanie Borgland

2014 CAN Young Investigator Awards

Dr. Stephanie Borgland, from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and
Dr. Brian Chen, from McGill University, are both winners of CAN Young Investigator Awards for 2014. Both were judged equally deserving of this distinction, which recognizes research excellence in a young neuroscientist.
Read their profiles here:
Brian Chen - Stephanie Borgland

Brian Chen

In Memoriam - John F MacDonald

The Canadian neuroscience community mourns the loss of an important member of our community, Dr. John F MacDonald, who passed away April 22.
Members of our community have written an obituary for this quintessential Canadian scientist: In memory of John F MacDonald
Online condolences at www.rskane.ca.

John F MacDonald

Canadian Neuroscience News

View more stories featured this year, or browse our news archives by topic, by month, or by year

International team sheds new light on biology underlying schizophrenia

ADN_animation

Genes, pathways identified could inform new approaches to treatment

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from Canada’s Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in what is the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date. The findings, published online in Nature, point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia, and could lead to new approaches to treating the disorder, which has seen little innovation in drug development in more than 60 years. +++ »

A weighty discovery

Randy Flanagan

Randall Flanagan

Humans have developed sophisticated concepts like mass and gravity to explain a wide range of everyday phenomena, but scientists have remarkably little understanding of how such concepts are represented by the brain.

Using advanced neuroimaging techniques, Queen’s University researchers have revealed how the brain stores knowledge about an object’s weight – information critical to our ability to successfully grasp and interact with objects in our environment. +++ »

New hope for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

Judes Poirier

Judes Poirier

A genetic variant conveys significant protection

Judes Poirier, PhD, C.Q., from the Douglas Mental Health Institute and McGill University in Montréal (Canada) and his team have discovered that a relatively frequent genetic variant actually conveys significant protection against the common form of Alzheimer’s disease and can delay the onset of the disease by as much as 4 years. This discovery opens new avenues for treatment against this devastating disease. +++ »

Scientists find important piece in the brain tumour puzzle

Anita Bellail

Anita Bellail

Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University and McGill University Health Centre have shown that a member of the protein family known as SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) is a key to why tumour cells multiply uncontrollably, especially in the case of glioblastoma. The SUMO family proteins modify other proteins and the SUMOylation of proteins are critical for many cellular processes. Identifying SUMO’s role in the cancer cell growth will lead to a new strategy for glioblastoma treatment. +++ »

Discovery of a new means to erase pain

Yves De Koninck

Yves De Koninck

A study published in the scientific journal Nature Neuroscience by Yves De Koninck and Robert Bonin, two researchers at Université Laval, reveals that it is possible to relieve pain hypersensitivity using a new method that involves rekindling pain so that it can subsequently be erased. This discovery could lead to novel means to alleviate chronic pain. +++ »

International study yields important clues to the genetics of epilepsy

Guy Rouleau

Guy Rouleau

An international team of researchers has discovered a significant genetic component of Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy (IGE), the most common form of epilepsy. Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by sudden, uncontrolled electrical discharges in the brain expressed as a seizure. The new research, published in this week’s issue of EMBO Reports, implicates a mutation in the gene for a protein, known as cotransporter KCC2. +++ »