Learning mechanisms of pain – PhD or post-doctoral position, Martin lab, University of Toronto

The ability to predict pain or other unpleasant events by learning from prior experience is an important adaptive behavior in healthy organisms and can cause disabling fear and avoidance in patients with chronic pain. While there is no single ‘pain processing area of the brain’, our recent efforts have focused on the role of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), due to its capacity to modulate pain and emotion based on prior experience.

The Martin Lab (www.martinpainlab.com) at the University of Toronto is currently seeking an independent, highly motivated and enthusiastic individual to study the molecular and synaptic basis of pain memory. Specifically, the candidate will be tasked with developing novel behavioural models of pain memory and should have a strong interest in neural circuits, in vivo imaging and electrophysiology.

Qualified postdoctoral candidates should have extensive experience with in vitro (patch-clamp) electrophysiological techniques, in vivo optogenetics or fiber photometry. Experience with molecular biology and/or immunohistochemistry are strong assets for both positions.

The postdoctoral position is available to start July 2020 (or later) and the deadline for graduate student applications is December 1, 2019 (Department of Psychology) or February 15, 2020 (Cell, Systems & Biology).

To apply, please send a brief statement of research interests, CV, and contact information for 3 references to lj.martin@utoronto.ca.

Contact information

Loren J. Martin, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, University of Toronto Mississauga
Tier II Canada Research Chair in Translational Pain Research
Department of Psychology, CCT Building, Room 4061
3359 Mississauga Rd, Mississauga, ON, L5L 1C6