Science should be an election issue – read our Op-Ed in Le Devoir

Read an Op-Ed signed by the Presidents of CAN, Katalin Toth, and of the Canadian Society for Molecular Biosciences, Tarik Moroy, this morning in Le Devoir.  Scientific research is important for all Canadians – it is how Canada can face the issues and challenges we face today. Political leaders should commit to supporting science today.
Read our op-ed here (in French):
https://www.ledevoir.com/opinion/idees/564375/la-science-n-est-pas-un-enjeu-electoral-mais-elle-devrait-l-etre

The Liberal Party answers CAN’s questions about science support

We have received a response from the Liberal Party of Canada to our five questions about science support.

  1. Is your Party committed to fully implementing the report of the Fundamental Science Review (Naylor report) with additional financial investment into open competitions to maintain Canada as a forefront leader in research innovation and research discoveries?

Our Liberal government believes in evidence-based policy and in science and in the Canadians behind the next big ideas. After a decade of setbacks and cuts to science under the Harper Conservatives, our government is rebuilding Canadian research and supporting our country’s greatest minds.  We unmuzzled our scientists, brought back the long-form census, and re-instated the position of the Chief Science Advisor. Continue reading

Green party responds to our questions for candidates in advance of the federal election

Last July, CAN sent five questions to the Liberal, Conservative, NPD and Green party in advance of the upcoming federal elections, which we have summarized below. Read our full questions, with context, here. 

The Green Party of Canada responded first. The questions were submitted to Mrs. Amita Kuttner, Shadow Minister of Science and Innovation for the Green Party of Canada – her response is copied here: Continue reading

Invitation to join the #VoteScience Campaign

CAN is proud to support the #VoteScience campaign, and invites all scientists to participate!

Vote science logo

#VoteScience

Advocating for Science in the Canadian Federal Election
Science doesn’t usually get a lot of attention during elections, and we think that needs to change. We need your help to send a message that Canadians care about science.

Learn how to get involved on the votescience.ca website

Growing up high: Neurobiological consequences of adolescent cannabis use

Canadian neuroscientists offer insights into the long-term effects of adolescent cannabis use

Published on Eurekalert, May 25, 2019

Link: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-05/cafn-guh052219.php

About one in five Canadian adolescents uses cannabis (19% of Canadians aged 15-19), and its recent legalization across the country warrants investigation into the consequence of this use on the developing brain. Adolescence is associated with the maturation of cognitive functions, such as working memory, decision-making, and impulsivity control. This is a highly vulnerable period for the development of the brain as it represents a critical period wherein regulatory connection between higher-order regions of the cortex and emotional processing circuits deeper inside the brain are established. It is a period of strong remodeling, making adolescents highly vulnerable to drug-related developmental disturbances. Research presented by Canadian neuroscientists Patricia Conrod, Steven Laviolette, Iris Balodis and Jibran Khokhar at the 2019 Canadian Neuroscience Meeting in Toronto on May 25 featured recent discoveries on the effects of cannabis on the adolescent brain. Continue reading

New approaches to study the genetics of autism spectrum disorder may lead to new therapies

Published on Eurekalert, May 24, 2019

Link: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-05/cafn-nat052019.php

Canadian neuroscientists are using novel experimental approaches to understand autism spectrum disorder, from studying multiple variation in a single gene to the investigation of networks of interacting genes to find new treatments for the disorder.

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects more than 1% of children, yet most cases are of unknown or poorly defined genetic origin. It is highly variable disorder, both in its presentation and in its genetics – hundreds of risk genes have been identified. One key to understanding and ultimately treating ASD is to identify common molecular mechanisms underlying this genetically heterogeneous disorder. Four Canadian researchers presented the results of unique approaches to understand ASD at the 14th Canadian Neuroscience Meeting in Toronto, on May 24, 2019. Continue reading

Advocacy Training: Be an effective advocate for science: Be involved & Tell your story

SfN and CAN join forces to bring you advocacy training that explains:

  • Why advocacy matters
  • How you can make an impact
  • How informing lawmakers can advance neuroscience priorities
  • How the Canadian budget process works
  • How SfN and CAN can be your resource
  • How to plan a #neuroadvocate activity

Speakers:

Michael Heintz, Director of Advocacy & Training at Society for Neuroscience

Melanie Woodin, Chair of the CAN advocacy committee

Julie Poupart, CAN Advocacy Officer

(you are free to use / reuse this content – please acknowledge the Society for Neuroscience and the Canadian Association for Neuroscience if you do).

Other CAN-ACN Resources

Meeting your MP

Getting ready for budget 2019

Why advocate?