Summer 2014 Newsletter!

Our most recent newsletter includes highlights from our Montreal meeting and more! Read it now:
CAN Connection - Summer 2014

CAN connection

Tang prize in Psychology

The TANG Prize for Achievements in Psychology honours a living internationally-recognized scholar in Psychology or a closely-related field who has made an exceptional contribution to the field anywhere in the world. It includes a $100 000 CAD prize.
The Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto is accepting applications for this prize until August 15, 2014.
More details at http://www.psych.utoronto.ca/tangprize/

CAN connection

Canadian Neuroscience Meeting 2014

Thank you for making our meeting in Montreal such a great success!

View the meeting website
Or visit our Flickr gallery to view pictures of the meeting!

2014 CAN Young Investigator Awards

Dr. Stephanie Borgland, from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and
Dr. Brian Chen, from McGill University, are both winners of CAN Young Investigator Awards for 2014. Both were judged equally deserving of this distinction, which recognizes research excellence of a young neuroscientist.
Read their profiles here:
Brian Chen - Stephanie Borgland

Stephanie Borgland

2014 CAN Young Investigator Awards

Dr. Stephanie Borgland, from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and
Dr. Brian Chen, from McGill University, are both winners of CAN Young Investigator Awards for 2014. Both were judged equally deserving of this distinction, which recognizes research excellence in a young neuroscientist.
Read their profiles here:
Brian Chen - Stephanie Borgland

Brian Chen

In Memoriam - John F MacDonald

The Canadian neuroscience community mourns the loss of an important member of our community, Dr. John F MacDonald, who passed away April 22.
Members of our community have written an obituary for this quintessential Canadian scientist: In memory of John F MacDonald
Online condolences at www.rskane.ca.

John F MacDonald

Healthy tissues grafted to the brain of people with Huntington also develop signs of the disease

Francesca Cicchetti

Francesca Cicchetti

A recent study published in the journal Annals of Neurology reports that healthy tissue grafted to the brain of people with Huntington’s disease, in the hope of countering this neurological disorde, also develop signs of disease several years after transplantation. This discovery has not only profound implications for our understanding of the disease and how to treat it, but could also lead to the development of new therapies against various neurodegenerative disorders. +++ »

SickKids study shows how the brain creates the “big picture” by amalgamating memories over time

Paul Frankland

Paul Frankland

Scientists have long hypothesized that our overall understanding of the world is based on collections of experiences, rather than distinct, individual memories. In a new study led by The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), neuroscientists demonstrate for the first time that long after a set of related memories is formed the brain amalgamates the memories based on their commonalities, forming a pattern or category. +++ »

What is being said in the media and academic literature about neurostimulation?

Eric Racine

Eric Racine

Over the past several decades, neurostimulation techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have gradually gained favour in the public eye. In a new report, published in the prestigious scientific journal Neuron, IRCM ethics experts directed by University of Montreal’s professor Éric Racine raise important questions about the rising tide of tDCS coverage in the media, while regulatory action is lacking and ethical issues need to be addressed. +++ »

A tiny molecule may help battle depression

Gustavo Turecki

Gustavo Turecki

Researchers find a small molecule that predicts treatment response for depressed patients

Levels of a small molecule found only in humans and in other primates are lower in the brains of depressed individuals, according to researchers at McGill University and the Douglas Institute. This discovery may hold a key to improving treatment options for those who suffer from depression. +++ »

University of Toronto biologists pave the way for improved epilepsy treatments

Melanie Woodin

Melanie Woodin

Discovery may lead to relief for victims of a range of neurological disorders

University of Toronto biologists leading an investigation into the cells that regulate proper brain function, have identified and located the key players whose actions contribute to afflictions such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. +++ »

‘Sticky synapses’ can impair new memories by holding on to old ones

Bamji and Mills

Bamji and Mills

A team of UBC neuroscientists has found that synapses that are too strong or ‘sticky’ can actually hinder our capacity to learn new things.

University of British Columbia researchers have discovered that so-called “sticky synapses” in the brain can impair new learning by excessively hard-wiring old memories and inhibiting our ability to adapt to our changing environment.

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