Canadian Neuroscience 2015 meeting in Vancouver, BC Canada impact of neurological disorders in Canada CAN Social Nov 18 at Brixton Pub O'Keefe and Dostrovsky 1971 Brain Research Fall 2014 Canadian Neuroscience newsletter Brenda Milner wins Kavli prize in neuroscience

 

CAMH discovery of novel drug target may lead to better treatment for schizophrenia

Dr. Fang Liu

Dr. Fang Liu

Scientists at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) have identified a novel drug target that could lead to the development of better antipsychotic medications.

Dr. Fang Liu, senior scientist in CAMH’s Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute and professor in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, and her team published their results online in the journal Neuron.

Multiplexing through dendritic gap junctions

Stuart Trenholm

Stuart Trenholm

How neurons communicate with each other is central to our understanding of the nervous system. Since the times of Golgi and Cajal, the roles of electrical vs. chemical forms of transmission have been much debated. While it is now well established that both electrical and chemical forms of transmission co-exist throughout the mammalian nervous system, gap junction-mediated electrical signals are found to be extremely weak compared to their chemical counterparts

Fragile X study offers hope of new autism treatment

Nahum Sonenberg

Dr. Nahum Sonenberg

People affected by a common inherited form of autism could be helped by a drug that is being tested as a treatment for cancer, according to researchers from the University of Edinburgh and McGill University.

Fragile X Syndrome is the most common genetic cause of autism spectrum disorders. It affects around 1 in 4,000 boys and 1 in 6,000 girls. Currently, there is no cure.

Finding “lost” languages in the brain

Denise Klein

Denise Klein

Study has far-reaching implications for unconscious role of infant experiences on adult development
An infant’s mother tongue creates neural patterns that the unconscious brain retains years later even if the child totally stops using the language, (as can happen in cases of international adoption) according to a new joint study by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital – The Neuro and McGill University’s Department of Psychology. The study offers the first neural evidence that traces of the “lost” language remain in the brain.

Total recall: the science behind it

Keith Murai

Keith Murai

MUHC-led study identifies new player in brain function and memory

Is it possible to change the amount of information the brain can store? Maybe, according to a new international study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC). Their research has identified a molecule that puts a brake on brain processing and when removed, brain function and memory recall is improved. Published in the latest issue of Cell Reports

Diversity among vesicles supports multilingualism in axons

Evstratova, Tóth, Chamberland

Evstratova, Tóth, Chamberland

Information is transferred from one neuron to another via synapses. This communication is mediated by neurotransmitters packaged into vesicles. These structures seem identical on electron microscopic images. However, recordings of electrical activity between neurons show that synapses operate under multiple modes of neurotransmitter release depending on the level of activity.