CAN Social at SfN2015 - Shay Chicago Toronto - CAN2016 meeting CAN2015 Michael Gordon CAN Newsletter January 2015 impact of neurological disorders in Canada

 

Practice doesn’t always make perfect (depending on your brain)

Dr. Robert Zatorre

Dr. Robert Zatorre

Study fuels nature versus nurture debate
How do you get to Carnegie Hall? New research on the brain’s capacity to learn suggests there’s more to it than the adage that “practise makes perfect.” A music-training study by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and colleagues in Germany found evidence to distinguish the parts of the brain that account for individual talent from the parts that are activated through training.

This is your brain on fried eggs

Stephanie Fulton

Stephanie Fulton

High-fat feeding can cause impairments in the functioning of the mesolimbic dopamine system, says Stephanie Fulton of the University of Montreal and the CHUM Research Centre (CRCHUM.) This system is a critical brain pathway controlling motivation. Fulton’s findings, published in Neuropsychopharmacology, may have great health implications.

His and hers pain circuitry in the spinal cord

Mike Salter

Mike Salter

Jeffrey Mogil

Jeffrey Mogil

New animal research reveals fundamental sex differences in how pain is processed.
New research released today in Nature Neuroscience reveals for the first time that pain is processed in male and female mice using different cells. These findings have far-reaching implications for our basic understanding of pain, how we develop the next generation of medications for chronic pain—which is by far the most prevalent human health condition—and the way we execute basic biomedical research using mice.

New Treatment Hope for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Alex Parker

Alex Parker

A previously unknown link between the immune system and the death of motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, has been discovered by scientists at the CHUM Research Centre and the University of Montreal. The finding paves the way to a whole new approach for finding a drug that can cure or at least slow the progression of such neurodegenerative diseases as ALS, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases.

Blood to feeling: McMaster scientists turn blood into neural cells

Bhatia and Singh

Bhatia and Singh

Scientists at McMaster University have discovered how to make adult sensory neurons from human patients simply by having them roll up their sleeve and providing a blood sample.

Specifically, stem cell scientists at McMaster can now directly convert adult human blood cells to both central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) neurons as well as neurons in the peripheral nervous system (rest of the body) that are responsible for pain, temperature and itch perception. This means that how a person’s nervous system cells react and respond to stimuli, can be determined from his blood.