CAN Newsletter January 2015 Canadian Neuroscience 2015 meeting in Vancouver, BC Canada impact of neurological disorders in Canada CAN Social Nov 18 at Brixton Pub Brenda Milner wins Kavli prize in neuroscience

 

Examining links between anxiety and chronic pain

Min Zhuo

Min Zhuo

Min Zhuo is a professor in the department of physiology at U of T and the Canada Research Chair in Pain and Cognition. Zhuo and his lab recently published a paper in the journal Neuron that showed how neuroplasticity – the brain’s ability to physically re-organize itself in response to experience – can spur the interplay between chronic pain and anxiety. They also showed that a drug they developed for chronic pain can limit anxiety.

Blame it on your brain: salt and hypertension

Charles Bourque

Charles Bourque

Study sheds new light on link between salt intake and blood pressure

An international research team led by scientists at McGill University has found that excessive salt intake “reprograms” the brain, interfering with a natural safety mechanism that normally prevents the body’s arterial blood pressure from rising.

York U researchers discover how midbrain map continuously updates visuospatial memory

Douglas Crawford

Douglas Crawford

On the upcoming Super Bowl Sunday, a lot of us will be playing arm-chair quarterback. After the snap, we might use our eyes to track a wide receiver as he runs toward an opening, all the while remembering the location of the star running back in case he breaks through on a rushing play. This natural ability to track one moving player but be ready to quickly look back toward another one sounds simple.

Research published in Neuron shows activity in neuron complex can predict attention

Dr. Julio Martinez-Trujillo

Dr. Julio Martinez-Trujillo

Humans and other primates have an extraordinary ability to voluntarily and efficiently focus attention on important information while ignoring distraction. For decades it has been hypothesized that this ability relies on the evolutionary expansion of the lateral prefrontal cortex, a part of the brain located in the lateral convexity of the frontal lobe, that reaches its highest level of complexity in primates.

U of Saskatchewan research reveals “major piece of the puzzle” in repairing nerves

Valerie Verge

Valerie Verge

A research team led by Valerie Verge at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) has discovered an important molecular worker in the repair shop of the body’s nervous system, a finding that brings them a step closer to new treatments for debilitating nerve injuries.

The molecule in question is called Luman, a nerve cell (neuron) protein discovered by Vikram Misra in the Western College of Veterinary Medicine while investigating the common cold sore virus.